William Henry Hall: The Drunk

The youngest child, William was born on 13 February 1842 in Batley, Yorkshire. His father was Jeremiah Hall and his mother was Harriet Hall. The couple married at Batley Parish Church on 8 September 1830 and had five children (including William) that survived infancy.

I do not want to dwell too much on William Henry’s childhood as my previous blog details it.

Find it here: https://genealogywithgeorge.com/2021/06/06/jeremiah-hall-the-forgotten-hall/

William married Eliza Ann Day, illegitimate daughter of Sarah Ann Day, at Batley Parish Church on 27 Jan 1866. The couple boarded with William’s mother, Harriet, from their marriage up until her death in 1877.

The only snapshot we have of this time is the 1871 Census. The Hall family was living on New Street in Batley (see map below) with Harriet Hall, a shopkeeper, recorded as the head of the household. William worked as a plucker and Eliza was the housekeeper.

Map of where the Halls lived in Batley

Two years after the death of his mother, which he was present at, William was charged and fined for being drunk and riotous. He is described as having no education, sandy hair and being five foot and a half. He worked as a card fettler. He remained in this occupation in 1881, and the family moved, not very far, to live at Spring Gardens, Batley.

He was back to court in 1884, where he was probably sent to prison for being drunk and riotous. The description remains the same but we get some get more details. He is described as a Wesleyan, he has freckled arms and a cut on his right eyebrow.

Maybe it was his traumatic childhood or the loss of his mother, who he seemed very close to, but William began to have troubles with alcohol. There was a story from his son Lewis which detailed the fact that his father made extra money selling shell fish in pubs to help fund his alcoholism.

His convictions died down for just over a decade. The family lived at 25 Beaumont Street in 1891 and William continued to work in the mills as a machine fettler.

Eliza and William had nine children in 18 years, with their first two children (a boy and a girl) dying as infants. Their youngest child was my Great Great Grandad Ernest James Hall, who was born on 11 Feb (my birthday!) 1885.

William got sent down again, in 1897, for being drunk and riotous and in 1900 for the same crime. By 1901, the family moves to 42 Cobden Street and William changes his occupation to a Willyer. According to my Grandad, this was an easier occupation compared to a Card Cleaner (or fettler) so this may show us that William was beginning to age.

In July 1904, William began to suffer from Cancer of the Thyroid. In a short two months, he died of the disease, aged 61 years, at Batley District Hospital on 24 September. His interment into plot 476 in section R at Batley Cemetery took place on 23 September 1904.

Plot 476 in section R at Batley Cemtery on 27 Dec 2020

William and his, ostensibly, undesirable story is one of my favourites. He wasn’t a perfect character at all but his story is very real; you can see the turning points in his life.

For those on Twitter, that is why the unmarked grave is so important to me.

Jeremiah Jackson: A Dyer Doomed to Death

Jeremiah Jackson was born in the second quarter of 1885 to Elizabeth (maiden name Broadhead), aged 36, and Thomas Hulme Jackson, aged 35, in Robertown. He was baptised shortly after birth on 21 Jun 1885 in Liversedge.

The couple married in the second quarter of 1875 and by 1891, the family resided in 3 rooms, on Lumb Lane in Robertown. Thomas worked as a mechanic and the couple had 2 sons (including Jeremiah) and one daugther living with them.

The Family moved to Barlborough in Derbyshire by 1901. Thomas worked as an engine wright at a colliery with his newly wedded son Daniel. Jeremiah lived with the family still but with no occupation.

Jeremiah and his family returned home to Liversedge before his marriage on 29 May 1909. He was wedded to the 23-year-old Harriet Lee at the Westgate Congregational Church in Heckmondwike. He resided on Lumb Lane and worked as a dyer’s labourer. Jeremiah and Harriet moved into Heckmondwike after marriage and Jeremiah took up work at Hunsworth Mills.

Wednesday 16 Mar 1910 would start as any other typical, boring day. Jeremiah arrived at work and began to mind a padding machine in the dyehouse. A crimp appeared in one of the pieces and when he tried to fix it he fell forwards. The rapid-moving piece dragged him into some hot liquor where he met his untimely, tragic end.

He was quite small and this caused him to be more prone to overbalance which made this tragic accident more likely.

He was buried at Liversedge Cemetery on 19 Mar 1910. His parents would follow him in the next decades.

Jeremiah Hall: The Forgotten Hall

The third child of Joseph Hall and Ann Gledhill was born on 4 Mar 1804 in the Parish of Batley. A boy, he would be given the name of Jeremiah and would be baptised1 at Batley Parish Church on 2 Apr 1804.

The Baptism of Jeremiah Hall at Batley Parish Church

Batley Parish Church was also the place where Joseph Hall and Ann Gledhill got married2 by banns on 20 Nov 1799. Joseph was able to leave his signature while Ann left her mark. By the baptism3 of his eldest child in Jul 1800, Joseph worked as a clothier. Clothiers4 made and sold woollen cloth with the wealth and status of each clothier varying greatly.

Batley Parish Church in the snow circa 1904. Kindly uploaded by Maggie Land Blanck (http://www.maggieblanck.com/).

By 1817, the couple had nine children in total, 4 boys and 5 girls, over a span of 17 years. The family resided in a world that was rapidly changing, with Batley feeling the effects of the Industrial Revolution. Deserted rural northern villages were becoming influential, populated industrial towns.

Jeremiah’s father, Joesph, aged 49 years, would be taken, by an unknown ailment, to the grave in June 1826. His burial5 would take place on 15 Jun 1826 at Batley Parish Church. Jeremiah was 22 years old when this took place.

Four years later, Jeremiah married6 Harriet Keighley at Batley Parish Church on 8 Sep 1830. The marriage took place after banns, with Jeremiah being able to leave his signature, like his father, while Harriet left her mark.

The Marriage of Jeremiah Hall and Harriet Keighley

The family continued to live in Batley, with Jeremiah taking the same occupation of his father. Jeremiah and Harriet would have 6 children over a period of 11 years. Their eldest daughter Grace Hall would die as an infant of an unknown cause. Her burial7 took place at Batley Parish Church on 22 Apr 1833.

By 18418, the Hall family was living at New Batley in Batley. Jeremiah continued to work as a Clothier in an everchanging world. 1842 would mark the last addition to the Hall family, with the birth of my Great Great Great Grandfather William Henry.

He drew his final breath9 on 14 May 1845 at New Batley at the young age of 41 years. Phthisis, tuberculosis or a similar wasting disease10, was what dragged him away from his family and life. His brother was in attendance at the time of his death. All five children that survived infancy outlived him, his mother and his wife also. Like his daughter and father, he was buried11 at Batley Parish Church on 18 May 1845.

The Death Certificate of Jeremiah Hall

He was just another of my Hall direct line to die young, following his father and like my Grandfather. His children may not have necessarily forgotten he existed, but I think mainly about my Great Great Grandfather William Henry, who was only 3, at the time, of his father’s premature death. He most likely wouldn’t even have had a strong memory of his father which is just heartbreaking.

I will never forget about Jeremiah Hall and his short but important story.

Citations

  1. West Yorkshire, England, Church of England Baptisms, Marriages and Burials, 1512-1812, Baptism, Batley, All Saints, 1804, Page 3, Jeremiah Hall; Digital image, Ancestry (www.ancestry.co.uk : accessed 7 Jun 2021); citing the new reference number WDP37/2, West Yorkshire Archive Service, Wakefield, Yorkshire
  2. West Yorkshire, England, Church of England Baptisms, Marriages and Burials, 1512-1812, Marriage, Batley, All Saints, 1799, Page 27, Joseph Hall and Ann Gleadhil; Digital image, Ancestry (www.ancestry.co.uk : accessed 7 Jun 2021); citing the new reference number WDP37/15, West Yorkshire Archive Service, Wakefield, Yorkshire
  3. West Yorkshire, England, Church of England Baptisms, Marriages and Burials, 1512-1812, Baptism, Batley, All Saints, 1800, Page 5, Elizabeth Hall; Digital image, Ancestry (www.ancestry.co.uk : accessed 7 Jun 2021); citing the new reference number WDP37/2, West Yorkshire Archive Service, Wakefield, Yorkshire
  4. https://www.geni.com/projects/Clothiers/27180
  5. West Yorkshire, England, Church of England Deaths and Burials, 1813-1985, Batley, All Saints, 1826, Page 5, Joseph Hall; Digital image, Ancestry (www.ancestry.co.uk : accessed 7 Jun 2021); citing the new reference number WDP37/40, West Yorkshire Archive Service, Wakefield, Yorkshire
  6. West Yorkshire, England, Church of England Marriages and Banns, 1813-1935, Batley, All Saints, 1830, Page 19, Jeremiah Hall and Harriet Keighley; Digital image, Ancestry (www.ancestry.co.uk : accessed 7 Jun 2021); citing the new reference number WDP37/18, West Yorkshire Archive Service, Wakefield, Yorkshire
  7. West Yorkshire, England, Church of England Deaths and Burials, 1813-1985, Batley, All Saints, 1833, Page 4, Grace Hall; Digital image, Ancestry (www.ancestry.co.uk : accessed 7 Jun 2021); citing the new reference number WDP37/40, West Yorkshire Archive Service, Wakefield, Yorkshire
  8. 1841 Census of England, Yorkshire, Batley, Subdistrict Batley, Enumeration District 9, page 13, Jeremiah Hall Household; Digital image, Ancestry (www.ancestry.co.uk : accessed 7 Jun 2021); citing Class H017, Piece 1267, Folio 49, GSU roll 464238, The National Archives, Kew, Surrey
  9. PDF copy of death certificate in personal collection of George Hall
  10. https://languages.oup.com/google-dictionary-en/
  11. West Yorkshire, England, Church of England Deaths and Burials, 1813-1985, Batley, All Saints, 1845, Page 8, Jeremiah Hall; Digital image, Ancestry (www.ancestry.co.uk : accessed 7 Jun 2021); citing the new reference number WDP37/41, West Yorkshire Archive Service, Wakefield, Yorkshire

York and Me: Blood and Beauty

York has always been a place I have loved since my first visit was in 2012, aged only 7 years. I went with mum and grandma to visit the city but also to see the Queen and the extended royal family who were in the city at the time.

My love of York began after this visit. I don’t remember a great deal about the trip in 2012 but we visited countless times throughout the next few years. I’ve been to the Dunegons; Jorvik centre; walls; minister amongst other things.

Me and my Dad at the ruins of St Mary’s Abbey in York (28 Oct 2016)

York blood flows through my veins, with 1893 marking the last time a direct ancestor (my Second Great Grandfather, Arthur Dale) was born in the city. The Dale line represents many tales of dramatic rises but equally as dramatic declines. Rising from being an orphan to a somewhat important local figure, William Dale’s tale represents the unlikely happening to a hairdresser in Jubbergate. He still had to face death in the eye throughout his 55 years, even meeting a morbid, sudden end himself.

The death of his grandson, Alfred Dale, at the hands of cancer, in 1906, left 7 children fatherless but also a widow who had to support them. They moved away from the city to find work in the mills of West Yorkshire, arriving in the Batley and Dewsbury areas by 1908.

Alfred Dale and his wife Mary Jane

Walking the streets felt different when I visited last week. Stories I had never known could be seen as I walked them and I felt a connection across the decades and centuries to those that preceded me in this city. Regardless if you’re a spiritual person, the spirits of the ancient city’s former residents truly do walk its streets.

Me otuside St Michael Le Belfrey’s Church (27 May 2021)

When the organ played as I walked around All Saints Pavement Church, it was the strongest connection I had ever felt to my ancestors. The fact that they were sat or stood in the church I was stood in centuries ago, celebrating birth and marriage but also grieving the loss of their family and loved ones struck me at the moment. I appreciate (even more) the ability to tell these stories and the hours of research and frustration is worth it when you see the bigger picture.

Ostensibly my connection to York was simple; it was one of a local city where I made a few memories but that’s not the case as it is much deeper. The stories and fragmented memories of my ancestors can be lived and breathed down the ancient winding streets of the city which is truly a rarity in a world that forgets about its history.

Please visit your ancestral homelands if you ever get the opportunity. It is very much worth it! I wouldn’t fret if you can’t though as merely remembering your ancestors is something to be proud of. Remember that we are not our ancestors but we can always still walk in their footsteps. Possibly learning something along the way.